07 September 2010, Tuesday, 12:54

A book about Ufa ambulance service is written

author: Alfia Agliullina

The collection of stories "Ambulance. The Principles of Life" about ambulance service and people who devoted their life to it has come out in Ufa. The author of the book is Irene Kamalieva who worked as a medical assistant at Ufa First-Aid Station for 11 years.

The book will appear in bookshops in the near future. Several copies will be given to the Ahmet Zeki Velidi National Library of Bashkortostan Republic, Central City Library of Ufa, Federal Agency for Press and Mass Communications of Russia, Russian Book Chamber and RB State Book Chamber.

The collection of Irene Kamalieva includes such stories as "Vasilisa", "Hope", "A Funny Thing", "Boomerang", "Classmates", "Madam" and other reminiscences of the author about her work. The book demonstrated the seamy side of the big city through the medium of workaday life of the ambulance team. The characters are the author herself and her colleagues.

The author cautions readers against faulty assessment of doctors' work. "One should not think that ambulance workers are hard-hearted and indifferent. In order to help people they must not feel sorry for them but think and act very attentively. Doctors, medical assistant, drivers, coordinating clerks must keep a cool head for the benefit of patients."

Irene Kamalieva says about her book: "Ambulance. The Principles of Life" is a collection of stories about people I met and remembered forever. Why these very people and these stories? I cannot answer this question even myself. I called it 'The Principles of Life" because I learned life from my patients. Ambulance service is a tremendous life experience that one cannot get anywhere else. That is why I feel great gratitude and even tenderness towards my former colleagues. There is a kind heart that cannot always bear other people's pain behind their sure actions and imperturbability. They know the value of life and often neglect their own material wealth and comfort. I left this job because day by day it got harder and harder for me to see human sufferings. I started to take everything much harder than I could afford and was no longer able to work in cold blood."